Infectious Disease

Women report less trust in the proximity of residents and visitors than men

September 28, 2021

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BrownC et al. Gender differences in patient safety and attitudes of medical students. Presented at: Women in Medicine Summit; 24.-25. September 2021 (virtual meeting).

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According to a presentation at the Women in Medicine Summit, third-year medical students reported having less confidence in talking about medical errors compared to their male counterparts.

“In our project, third-year medical students took part in a course on quality improvement and patient safety; We want to investigate how the perception of patient safety in medical students can be linked to gender. ” Sanket Aggarwal, BS, A medical student at Rush Medical College said during the presentation. “We focused on student confidence in talking about patient harm and their perceived importance of patient safety in medicine.”

To evaluate the study, 84 medical students in their third year of study (55% men) took part in patient didactics. The session was preceded by a 5-point Likert scale survey that assessed knowledge of patient safety and focused on students’ confidence to speak up about patient harm.

According to the study results, 9% and 32% of the female participants said they had “significant” and “moderate” experiences with patient safety, respectively, while 18% and 45% of the male participants said they had “significant” or “moderate” previous patient safety to have experience. When comparing trust ratings between women and men, they found that women were more confident about communicating patient safety to their peers (3.8 versus 3.7) but were less confident about communicating to residents ( 3.1 versus 3.7). and visitors (2.7 vs. 3.2).

“Students can see the importance of patient safety; However, female students reported lower levels of confidence in patient safety errors when contacting residents and carers. ” Christina Brown, BS, A medical student at Rush Medical College said during the presentation. “There could be a few explanations as to why that is; one could be prior patient experience. … This is a great way to bridge the gender gap in patient safety. It is our chance to empower women in medicine and to promote a just culture. “

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Women in Medicine Summit

Women in Medicine Summit

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