Infectious Disease

Weight problems is linked to a better threat of poor COVID-19 outcomes

March 08, 2021

2 min read

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Kompaniyets does not report any relevant financial information. In the study you will find all relevant financial information from all other authors.

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The risk of invasive mechanical ventilation, hospitalization, and death in patients with COVID-19 increased, according to a study with BMI published in MMWR.

“The results in this report underscore a dose-response relationship between higher BMI and severe COVID-19-associated disease and underscore the need for progressively intensive disease management as obesity becomes more severe.” Lyudmyla Kompaniyets, PhD, A postdoctoral fellow at CDC and colleagues wrote. “More strategies are needed to ensure community access to diet and physical activity options that promote and support healthy BMI.”

Reference: Kompaniyets L, et al. MMWR Morbid Mortal Wkly Rep. 2021; doi: 10.15585 / mmwr.mm7010e4.

Kompaniyets and colleagues evaluated the associations between BMI and risk of severe COVID-19 using data from the special COVID-19 version (PHD-SR) of the Premier Healthcare Database. The database contained patient height and weight information from 238 US hospitals.

Within the study, the researchers categorized patients as underweight if they had a BMI below 18.5 kg / m2, as a healthy weight if they had a BMI between 18.5 kg / m2 to 24.9 kg / m2, and as overweight if they had a BMI of 25 kg / m2 to 29.9 kg / m2. They also categorized obesity with a BMI of 30 kg / m2 to 34.9 kg / m2, 35 kg / m2 to 39.9 kg / m2, 40 kg / m2 to 44.9 kg / m2 or 45 kg / m2 or more .

Among 3,242,659 adult patients who received ED or inpatient treatment at the included facilities, 148,494 were diagnosed with COVID-19. Of these patients, 28.3% were overweight and 50.8% were obese.

Kompaniyets and colleagues found that obesity is a risk factor for hospitalizations and death. They found that the risk of COVID-19 hospitalization in obese patients compared to healthy-weight patients was increased by patients with a BMI of 30 kg / m2 to 34.9 kg / m2 (aRR = 1.07; 95% CI) increased 1.05–1.09) for people with a BMI of 45 kg / m2 or more (aRR = 1.33; 95% CI, 1.30–1.37).

They also found that the risk of death in obese patients varied from patients with a BMI of 30 kg / m2 to 34.9 kg / m2 (aRR = 1.08; 95% CI, 1.02-1.14) on patients with a BMI of 45 kg / m2 or more (aRR = 1.61; 95% CI, 1.47-1.76) compared to patients of healthy weight.

The researchers found that the risk of admission to the ICU for individuals with a BMI of 40 kg / m2 increased to 44.9 kg / m2 (aRR = 1.06; 95% CI, 1.03-1.1) on subjects with a BMI of 45 kg / m2 or more (aRR = 1.16; 95% CI, 1.11-1.20) compared to subjects of healthy weight.

Compared to patients of healthy weight, the risk of invasive mechanical ventilation increased from overweight patients (aRR = 1.12; 95% CI, 1.05-1.19) to patients with a BMI of 45 kg / m2 or more ( aRR = 2.08; 95)% CI, 1.89-2.29).

“The prevention of COVID-19 in adults with higher BMI and their close contacts remains important and includes a variety of protective measures such as masking as well as the continued prioritization and range of vaccines for this population,” wrote Kompaniyets and colleagues.

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