Infectious Disease

Videos reduce parent reluctance to get HPV vaccines

Source / information

Disclosure:
Shah does not report any relevant financial information. Please refer to the study for all relevant financial information from the other authors.

ADD SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALERTS

Receive an email when new articles are published on

Please enter your email address to receive an email when new articles are published on . “data-action =” subscribe “> subscribe

We could not process your request. Please try again later. If this problem persists, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

During a communication experiment, short videos showed a pediatrician announcing to parents that their child was due for an HPV vaccine and allied their concerns, decreased reluctance to adopt HPV vaccines.

The CDC previously reported that there has been some progress in adolescent HPV vaccination rates – 71.5% of adolescents ages 13-17 received one or more doses of the HPV vaccine and 54.2% completed the HPV Vaccination series in 2019, compared with 68.1%. of adolescents who received one or more doses of the HPV vaccine and 51.1% who completed the vaccination series in 2018. However, differences in HPV vaccination rates remain, according to the agency.

“Healthcare providers are incredibly influential in helping parents make decisions about vaccinating their children.” Parth Shah, PharmD, PhD, an assistant professor at the Hutchinson Institute for Cancer Outcomes Research in Washington, said Healio Primary Care. “However, there is a lot of misinformation and misunderstanding about [the HPV] So we wanted to find effective ways for vendors to talk about HPV vaccines that are medically correct, clear to parents and their children, and save time in clinical encounters so that other health issues can be discussed. “

Shah and colleagues have created videos designed to reduce hesitation about vaccines. The videos were modeled according to the “announcement approach”, an evidence-based communication strategy from Noel Brewer, PhD, from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. The strategy consists of videos informing parents that their child is due to be vaccinated against HPV, dispelling parents’ questions or concerns about the vaccine (“Ease” video) and encouraging parents to have their child vaccinated against HPV (“Encourage” – Video).

To assess the impact of the strategy, Shah and colleagues recruited a national online sample of 1,196 parents (mean age 43; non-Hispanic whites, 70%) of children ages 9-17 (mean age 13). Of the parents, 60% had children who did not start the HPV vaccination series. All parents were asked to watch a video announcing that their child would get an HPV vaccination. The parents were then randomly assigned to watch either “Ease” (n = 300), “Encourage” (n = 301), both videos (n = 294) or neither of these videos (n = 298).

According to the researchers, “Ease” shared information about diseases that HPV vaccination prevents, national HPV vaccine recommendations, the recommended age to start the series of vaccinations, the importance of vaccination for boys and girls, the educational requirements for those Vaccination and vaccine safety and adverse events. The video “Encourage” only showed one pediatrician saying, “I firmly believe in the importance of this cancer preventive vaccine for your child. I recommend your child to get the HPV vaccine today. “

Shah said that using videos instead of text or infographics “adds to the environmental validity of our study, as parents see a message from a pediatrician as they would if they were face to face with their child’s health care provider during a fountain would be “. Visit or visit the doctor. “

Parents participated in a survey about HPV vaccination before and after watching their randomly assigned video messages. Shah and colleagues then assessed children’s HPV vaccination status, parents’ general attitudes towards vaccines, and trait reactance to measure the influence of experimental factors on vaccine delay, vaccine confidence, and perceived recommendation strength.

The researchers reported in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine that the average HPV vaccine hesitant score of parents who saw “Ease” was lower than parents who did not (2.71 vs. 2.97; P <0.001). In addition, parents who saw "Ease" had more confidence in the benefits of the HPV vaccine compared to those who didn't, with confidence scores of 3.61 vs. 3.43 (P = 0.008). In contrast, the video "Encourage" had no significant impact on reluctance or confidence in HPV vaccines, according to Shah and colleagues.

“The announcement approach provides an effective way for vendors to communicate about the HPV vaccine, which saves time in clinical meetings and results in same-day HPV vaccination,” the researchers concluded.

References:

Elam-Evans LD et al. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly. 2019; doi: 10.15585 / mmwr.mm6933.

Shah PD et al. Am J Back Med. 2021; doi: 10.1016 / j.amepre.2021.02.009.

Walker TY et al. MMWR Morb Mortal Wkly. 2019: doi: 10.15585 / mmwr.mm6833a2.

perspective

Back to top
Debbie Saslow, PhD)

Debbie Saslow, PhD

HPV vaccination rates were too low before the COVID-19 pandemic, now they’re even lower.

When it comes to the HPV vaccine, there remains a discrepancy between what healthcare providers think, do, and say, and what parents perceive and hear. Additionally, there is a discrepancy between what health care providers think parents want for their children and what parents really think and feel. Healthcare providers also need to know that a parent or patient concern is not the same as a refusal to vaccinate. This means that the parent’s or patient’s question should be answered.

Doctors will typically encounter one of three questions from patients about the HPV vaccine. # 1: will this vaccine work? And the answer is absolutely, yes. Many studies confirm this, including a recent study that shows the prevention of 88% of invasive cervical cancers. # 2: is this vaccine safe? There have been more than 100 studies suggesting that again, the answer is absolutely yes. No. 3: Does my child need this? Again and absolutely, yes; Everyone – boys and girls – is at risk of developing HPV, which has the potential to lead to cancer.

Debbie Saslow, PhD

Executive Director, HPV and Gynecologic Cancers, American Cancer Society

Disclosure: Saslow does not report any relevant financial information.

ADD SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALERTS

Receive an email when new articles are published on

Please enter your email address to receive an email when new articles are published on . “data-action =” subscribe “> subscribe

We could not process your request. Please try again later. If this problem persists, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

Related Articles