Infectious Disease

Updated CDC guidance has implications for children, schools

August 15, 2022

2 min read

Source/Disclosures

sources:

Healio Interview.

Disclosures:
O’Leary reports no relevant financial disclosures.

ADD TOPIC TO EMAIL ALERTS

Receive an email when new articles are posted on

Please provide your email address to receive an email when new articles are posted on . ” data-action=”subscribe”> Subscribe

We were unable to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this issue please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

The CDC has updated its guidance for COVID-19, including loosening recommendations that will affect the way students return to classrooms in the upcoming school year.

We spoke with Sonja C O’Leary, MDmedical director of school-based health centers at Denver Health and chair of the AAP’s Council on School Health, about the updated guidance and other challenges facing K-12 systems this year.

Healio: What does the updated CDC guidance say about children and schools, and is it meant to make it easier for schools to stay open and for kids to stay in school?

O’Leary: The big message is that it is up to the individual to protect themselves and others from COVID. In addition, it removes prior recommendations for cohorting, quarantine and “test to stay” procedures, and limits recommendations for screening and testing to certain high-risk situations.

All in all, the guidance makes it easier for schools to keep kids in the classroom. We all know how much our kids were affected by the pandemic — the isolation, the disrupted learning — but two important things have happened: We have vaccines to keep kids and adults from getting severe disease and hospitalization, and the COVID‐19 virus of today is different from the one 2 years ago.

Healio: With COVID‐19 vaccines now available for all K‐12 age groups, what is left to say to parents who remain hesitant about vaccinating their children before the school year?

O’Leary: The vaccines work and are safe. They also protect kids in grades K through 12 from severe disease and hospitalization. We recommend that all kids be up to date on all vaccines, including COVID‐19 and influenza in order to keep them safe, healthy and ready to learn.

Healio: How can teachers and staff help minimize spread while meeting academic and social goals?

O’Leary: Teachers and staff need to be vaccinated and boosted. Schools can also make sure they have adequate ventilation, make sure that staff and kids stay home if sick, and finally, have good universal infection prevention policies against any infection.

Healio: Much has been written about pediatric mental health during the pandemic. How can schools address this?

O’Leary: Our kids are going through unprecedented times, and families and schools can do the following: watch for signs and symptoms of distress in their students, continue working on an inclusive and warm socioemotional climate in the school, and partner with mental health providers to provide services as needed.

ADD TOPIC TO EMAIL ALERTS

Receive an email when new articles are posted on

Please provide your email address to receive an email when new articles are posted on . ” data-action=”subscribe”> Subscribe

We were unable to process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this issue please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

School supplies, including mask and hand sanitizer

back to school

Related Articles