Infectious Disease

Study shows COVID-19 vaccines offer better protection than previous infection

August 06, 2021

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Walensky does not report any relevant financial information. The authors do not report any relevant financial information.

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New study data show that vaccination offers better protection against COVID-19 than a previous infection, the CDC said on Friday.

The data come from a study published in the MMWR that included more than 200 previously infected Kentucky residents. Study participants who were not vaccinated were 2.34 times more likely to be infected with SARS-CoV-2, researchers reported.

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The vaccination offers better protection against COVID-19 than a previous infection, the CDC said. Source: Adobe Stock.

“If you have ever had COVID-19, please get vaccinated anyway,” said CDC director Rochelle Walensky, MD, MPH, said in a statement. “This study shows that if you are not vaccinated, you are twice as likely to get infected again. The vaccine is the best way to protect yourself and others around you, especially as the more contagious Delta variant is spreading across the country. “

In the study, Alyson M. Cavanaugh, PhD, DPT, MPH, An official with the CDC Epidemic Intelligence Service, embedded in the Kentucky Department for Public Health, and colleagues evaluated reinfections in Kentucky residents aged 18 or older who had a first case between March and December 2020 and in May or June a positive test occurred this year. They included a control group of people who were not re-infected during this period.

A total of 246 case patients were included in the study and 492 patients in the control group. Of the case patients, 20.3% were fully vaccinated compared to 34.3% of the patients in the control group, which shows that the unvaccinated participants were more likely to be re-infected compared to those who were fully vaccinated (OR 2.34; 95% CI 1.58-347).

Participants who were partially vaccinated had a 1.56 increased risk of re-infecting (95% CI, 0.81-3.01).

“Vaccination should be offered to all eligible individuals, including those with previous SARS-CoV-2 infection, to reduce their risk of future infection,” wrote Cavanaugh and colleagues.

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