Infectious Disease

Self-reported HPV vaccination rates are “low” but increase over time

April 27, 2021

2 min read

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Chen does not report any relevant financial information. In the study you will find all relevant financial information from all other authors.

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Self-reported HPV vaccination rates in young men and women ages 18-21 were “low” but increased over time, researchers wrote.

The data also showed that overall HPV vaccination rates in men lagged behind women.

Reference: Chen MM et al. JAMA. 2021; doi: 10.1001 / jama.2021.0725

“HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the US and is associated with several malignancies, including oropharyngeal, cervical, vaginal, vulvar, penile and anal cancers.” Michelle M. Chen, MD, MHS, A clinical lecturer in the Department of Otorhinolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery at the University of Michigan told Healio Primary Care, “In 2020, the FDA expanded the indications for HPV vaccination to include prevention of oropharyngeal disease Cancer, which is the most common HPV-associated malignancy, and about 80% of patients with oropharyngeal cancer are male. “

Michelle M. Chen

Chen and colleagues analyzed unweighted data from 6,606 women and 6,038 men who participated in the National Health Interview Survey from 2010 to 2018 to assess HPV vaccination rates and determine differences in vaccination rates between the sexes.

The researchers reported in JAMA that after data weighting, 41.6% (95% CI, 40% -43.2%) of the women and 16.2% (95% CI, 14.8% -17.7%) of the Men reported receiving at least one dose of HPV vaccine at each age. The vaccination rate for women increased from 32.2% (95% CI, 27.9% -36.7%) in 2010 to 55.2% (95% CI, 49.4% -60.9%) in the year 2018 (P = 0.001). In men, this rate increased from 1.6% (95% CI, 0.6% -4.1%) to 34.1% (95% CI, 28.5% -40%) (P <0.001 ).

In addition, 3.8% (95% CI, 3.4% -4.3%) of all women in the study received their first HPV vaccine dose between the ages of 18 and 21 years; Of all men, 2.7% (95% CI, 2.3% -3.1%) received their first dose between the ages of 18 and 21 years. A total of 46.3% (95% CI, 37.6% -55.2%) of these women and 29.1% (95% CI, 20.4% -39.7%) of these men received the entire series of three Cans.

“In recent years, vaccination rates for teenage boys have increased to be close to that for teenage girls,” said Chen. “However, overall male vaccination rates are still lagging behind, and we could do better catch-up vaccination for men.”

Chen and colleagues suggested several ways to increase vaccine intake in young adults, such as: B. Identifying HPV vaccination status when providing influenza vaccine and removing cost barriers. To improve HPV vaccination rates in men, the researchers recommended using university or community vaccination campaigns and providing adult primary care physicians with information about the risk of HPV-associated cancers.

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Debbie Saslow, PhD)

Debbie Saslow, PhD

Chen and colleagues measured HPV vaccination reception for men and women ages 18 to 21 from 2010 to 2018. Their results are similar to the self-reported data of young adults in the data report from the National Center for Health Statistics published by the CDC in January 2020.

Given the dramatic decline in vaccinations in adolescents due to COVID-19, as well as overwhelming evidence of high effectiveness of HPV vaccination in the recommended ages of 9-12 and poor effectiveness of HPV cancer prevention in those aged 17 and over, strategies for improvement The vaccine intake should focus on adolescents.

It is important that we give priority to vaccinating adolescents and reversing the declines caused by the pandemic. This means ensuring that all adolescents receive referrals from providers and that doctors improve vaccination opportunities and use evidence-based interventions such as reminder / recall. Intensive efforts will be needed to meet the national target of 80% of adolescents being fully vaccinated against HPV cancer.

Debbie Saslow, PhD

General Manager, HPV & Gynecologic Cancers, American Cancer Society

Disclosure: Saslow does not report any relevant financial information.

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Jeffrey Klausner, MD, MPH)

Jeffrey Klausner, MD, MPH

The results of Chen and colleagues’ study are consistent with what we’ve been seeing here in California and across the country since 2018. Over the past year, these researchers have compiled data for their study.

It is a public health failure that the HPV vaccination rate remains far too low in this country, considering that we have a very safe and effective vaccine to prevent the disease. To improve the trends identified by Chen and colleagues, clinicians can advocate changing the guidelines, such as: B. the requirement for an HPV vaccination when entering school. Places like Rhode Island and District of Columbia have done so and seen a huge increase in the proportion of the population, adolescents, and young adults who have been vaccinated against HPV.

Jeffrey Klausner, MD, MPH

Clinical Professor of Preventive Medicine at the University of Southern California’s Keck School of Medicine
Former Assistant Health Officer and Director, STD Prevention and Control Services, San Francisco Department of Health

Disclosure: Klausner does not report any relevant financial information.

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