Infectious Disease

SARS-CoV-2 vaccine produces strong antibody response in IBD patients

April 13, 2022

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The authors report no relevant financial disclosures.

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A comprehensive review of data showed that two doses of a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine were safe and effective in patients with inflammatory bowel disease, according to a report in Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics.

“The efficacy of the SARS-CoV-2 vaccines has been demonstrated in several clinical trials; however, patients with IBD or those treated with immunosuppressive medications were excluded from these studies,” Abhishek Bhurwal, MD, of the division of gastroenterology and hepatology at Rutgers Robert Wood Johnson School of Medicine, and colleagues wrote. “Therefore, multiple questions regarding the effectiveness of the SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in IBD have emerged.”

Pooled seroconversion rates following SARS-CoV-2 vaccination in IBD: One SARS-CoV-2 vaccine dose;  73.7% VS.  Two SARS-CoV-2 vaccine doses;  96.8%

In a systematic review and meta-analysis, Bhurwal and colleagues reviewed 21 studies that detailed patient response to a SARS-CoV-2 vaccine. Specifically, they investigated pooled seroconversion rates, breakthrough infection rates among vaccinated patients with IBD vs. controls and adverse event rates. All outcomes were evaluated for first and second doses of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine.

According to analysis, the pooled seroconversion rates following first and second doses of SARS-CoV-2 vaccine were 73.7% (95% CI, 38.1-92.7) and 96.8% (95% CI, 94-98.3), respectively, with a statistically significant difference between seroconversion rates after each dose (P=.005). Further, when comparing immunosuppressive medication regimens, researchers noted non-statistically significant differences for seroconversion.

There were also no statistically significant differences in breakthrough infection among IBD patients compared with controls following first and second doses (OR = 0.99; 95% CI, 0.71-1.38 and OR = 0.72; 95% CI, 0.29-1.77). Pooled adverse event rates were 2.2% (95% CI, 1.4-3.6) and 0.09% (95% CI, 0.01-0.091), respectively.

“Because members of the IBD population are immunocompromised, it was important to document that the SARS-CoV-2 vaccines work for them,” Bhurwal said in a Rutgers University press release. “With this analysis, we can say that two doses of the SARS-CoV-2 vaccines are safe and effective in the IBD population. But we need further studies regarding booster doses and COVID variants.”

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