Infectious Disease

NIH allocates nearly $ 470 million to lengthy COVID research

16.09.2021

Read for 1 minute

Source / information

Published by:

Disclosure:
Collins and Gibbons do not report any relevant financial information.

ADD SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALERTS

Receive an email when new articles are published on

Please enter your email address to receive an email when new articles are published on . “data-action =” subscribe “> subscribe

We could not process your request. Please try again later. If this problem persists, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

The NIH has allocated nearly $ 470 million to fund large-scale national studies of long-term COVID that could involve tens of thousands of patients.

Long COVID has been linked to more than 200 symptoms and can affect adults and children.

Woman with flu

Source: Adobe Stock.

“We know that some people’s lives have been turned upside down by the great long-term effects of COVID-19,” said NIH director Francis S. Collins, MD, PhDsaid in a press release. “These studies will aim to identify the root cause and find much-needed answers to prevent this often debilitating condition and help those with the disease move toward recovery.”

The NIH’s Researching COVID to Enhance Recovery Initiative (RECOVER), which was launched to investigate why some COVID-19 symptoms prolonged, has given New York University Langone Health the grand prize for research, which has several Underpricing will be given to more than 100 researchers at more than 30 institutions, the NIH said.

The award to NYU Langone Health will support new studies of COVID-19 survivors as well as long-term large cohort studies with an expansion of the current research focus. This combined population of existing cohorts, together with new ones – also known as meta-cohorts – form the RECOVER cohort.

“This scientifically rigorous approach creates a collaborative and multidisciplinary research community that includes diverse research participants who are critical to educating the treatment and prevention of the long-term effects of COVID-19.” Gary H. Gibbons, MD, Co-chair of the RECOVER initiative and director of the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the NIH, said in the press release.

The data in the RECOVER cohort will include clinical information, laboratory tests, and analysis from participants at various stages of recovery from COVID-19, the NIH said. According to the press release, with instant access to the data, researchers are expected to speed up the timeline for this research.

The study cohorts include adult, pregnant, and pediatric populations. Patients are enrolled during the acute and post-acute phase of SARS-CoV-2 infection. Studies will assess tissue pathology, analyze data from millions of electronic health records, and leverage mobile health technologies.

perspective

Back to top

Ziyad Al-Aly, MD, FASN

Ziyad Al-Aly

This is an important step in the right direction, but overall, my impression, and that of the patients I speak with, is that the research on this is too slow. Much of it is not designed to help solve problems that people care about.

We need more from the NIH and the United States government. We need a coordinated national strategy to understand and deal with long-term COVID. The answer has been scattered all over the place so far. I’ve already said it: we dropped the ball on COVID-19, and I am increasingly concerned that our long-term COVID-19 response is not where it needs to be.

Ziyad Al-Aly, MD, FASN

Director, Center for Clinical Epidemiology

Head of Research and Development Service

Veterans Affairs St. Louis Health System

Disclosure: Al-Aly does not report any relevant financial information.

ADD SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALERTS

Receive an email when new articles are published on

Please enter your email address to receive an email when new articles are published on . “data-action =” subscribe “> subscribe

We could not process your request. Please try again later. If this problem persists, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

COVID-19 Resource Center

COVID-19 Resource Center

Related Articles