Infectious Disease

More frequent egg consumption in infancy combined with less egg allergy in childhood

November 06, 2021

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Martin G. et al. Summary A050. Presented at: ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting; 4-8 November 2021; New Orleans (hybrid meeting).

Disclosure:
The researchers report no relevant financial disclosures.

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Children who ate eggs more often as infants were less likely to have egg allergies later in childhood, according to a study presented at the American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology’s annual scientific meeting.

The researchers found that, according to the current state of knowledge, early introduction through consistent, frequent feeding can prevent the development of egg allergies, although the optimal time for this introduction and the frequency of feeding must be clarified.

The data was provided by Martone G, et al. Summary A050. Presented at: ACAAI Annual Scientific Meeting; 4-8 November 2021; New Orleans (hybrid meeting).

“We examined infant feeding and food allergy data from birth to age 6 from 2,237 surveys in the Infant Feeding Practices Study II conducted by the CDC and FDA,” study author Giulia Martone, MD, Allergy and Immunology Fellow at the University of Buffalo, according to a press release. “We found that children in whom the egg had not yet been introduced by the age of 12 months are more likely to have an egg allergy by the age of 6.”

The data included 2,237 participants, of whom 1,379 submitted complete food allergy data over a 6-year period.

The researchers found that 14 children (0.6%) had an egg allergy by the age of 1 and 11 (0.8%) had an egg allergy by the age of 6. The children who were not familiarized with eggs by the age of 1 were more likely to have an egg allergy by the age of 6 (9 of 472 children, 0.02% vs. 2 of 682 children, 0%, P <0.001 ).

Meanwhile, the children who had an egg allergy by ages 1 year and 6 years were less likely to consume eggs by ages 4, 5, 6, 9, and 10 months, the researchers said. In particular, the children with an egg allergy at 1 year of age ate fewer eggs by 10 months than those who were not allergic to eggs (0.36 eggs / week vs. 0.93 eggs / week, P = 0.021).

The researchers also found that children who were allergic to eggs by the age of 6 ate fewer eggs than those who were not allergic to eggs at 10 months (0.09 eggs / week vs. 0.93 eggs / week, P < 0.001).

“Egg allergy is the second most common food allergy in the world,” study author Xiaozhong Wen, MD, PhD, associate professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Buffalo’s Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, said in the press release.

“Current evidence suggests that introducing eggs early during infancy, followed by consistent and frequent feeding, appears to protect against the development of egg allergy. We are still investigating the optimal time to introduce baby eggs and the frequency of feeding. ”

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American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting

American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology Annual Scientific Meeting

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