Infectious Disease

Menopause can increase immune activation in women with HIV

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Peters does not disclose any relevant financial information. Please refer to the study for all relevant financial information from the other authors.

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Postmenopausal women with HIV had higher levels of immune activation than premenopausal women with HIV, according to a study published in the Journal of Infectious Diseases.

“So little is known about the health consequences of menopause that are specific to women with HIV.” Brandilyn A. Peters, PhD, Assistant Professor of Epidemiology at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Healio said. “In general, immune activation is a persistent problem in people with HIV, so we wanted to know how menopause affects this phenomenon.”

HIV under the microscope

Researchers found that menopause can increase immune activation in women with HIV, according to a recent study.
Source: Adobe Stock.

Peters and colleagues examined 350 HIV-infected women from the Women’s Interagency HIV Study by using plasma biomarkers for intestinal barrier dysfunction (intestinal fatty acid binding protein [IFAB]), Activation of the innate immune system (soluble CD14 [sCD14] and soluble CD163 [sCD163]) and systemic inflammation (interleukin-6 [IL-6] and tumor necrosis factor receptor 1 [TNFR1]) during 674 person visits over almost 2 years.

Brandilyn A. Peters

Adjusted study data showed that menopause compared to premenopausal women with a 161.89 ng / ml higher plasma sCD14 (95% CI, 18.37-305.41) and 65.48 ng / ml higher sCD163 (95% CI , 6.64-124.33).

“Combined effects of HIV, aging and menopause on immune activation could put aging women with HIV at a particularly high risk of comorbidities,” said Peters. “Clinical research on interventions (e.g. health monitoring, lifestyle changes, hormone therapy) to reduce disease risk will be important in this high-risk group.”

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