Infectious Disease

Hospitalized children with asthma who receive ibuprofen have shorter stays

Source / information

Source:

Shah N. et al. NSAIDs and obesity among hospitalized children with asthma. Presented at: Annual Meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies; April 30 – May 4, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosure:
Gross and Shah do not report any relevant financial information.

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Children who have been hospitalized for asthma exacerbations and treated with ibuprofen spend less time in the hospital than children treated with paracetamol. This was shown by data presented at the annual meeting of the Virtual Pediatric Academic Societies.

Nisha shah, a medical student at Albert Einstein College of Medicine and Children’s Hospital in Montefiore, Bronx, and colleagues performed a retrospective chart review in children ages 2 to 18 who were hospitalized for asthma exacerbations between 2017 and 2019.

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“We excluded patients with complex medical comorbidities and those who are not receiving a standard of care for asthma,” said Shah in her presentation.

According to Shah, 1,769 patients met the criteria for inclusion in the study. Overall, the researchers found that patients who received ibuprofen had a shorter mean length of stay (1.98 days) than patients who were treated with paracetamol (2.48 days).

In addition, patients with class 3 obesity had a longer length of stay than all others in a subset analysis by weight class (2.92 days). Among 788 patients classified as obese or overweight, those who received ibuprofen had a shorter length of stay (2.08 days) than those who received acetaminophen (2.69 days).

“It is believed that obesity-related asthma has a different pathophysiology than asthma in children of normal weight. In particular, there is increased fat-mediated inflammation of the obese phenotype, ”explained Shah.

According to Shah, the resulting data showed that “ibuprofen’s anti-inflammatory mechanisms may play some role in the treatment of asthma, particularly in those who are overweight or obese and have poorer clinical outcomes”.

Elissa B. Gross, DO, MPH, An attending physician in the Department of Hospital Medicine at Montefiore Children’s Hospital and co-author of the study said the results offer additional benefits.

“This could save health costs and reduce missed school days for children,” Gross told Healio. “More research is needed to see if ibuprofen can help children with asthma.”

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Annual Meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies

Annual Meeting of the Pediatric Academic Societies

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