Infectious Disease

Dysphagia, dysphagia that’s widespread in multisystem pediatric irritation attributable to COVID

February 26, 2021

2 min read

Source / information

Published by:

Disclosure:
The researchers do not report any relevant financial information.

ADD SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALARMS

Receive an email when new articles are published

Please enter your email address to receive an email when new articles are published . “data-action =” subscribe “> subscribe

We could not process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this problem, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

Dysphonia, dysphagia, and anosmia / hyposmia were the most common otolaryngological manifestations in a small cohort of children with pediatric multisystem inflammatory syndrome temporally associated with COVID-19, according to data.

“As a result of the increasing reports of an unusual and novel presentation of a multisystem inflammatory disease in the UK, the Royal College of Pediatrics and Child Health published a case definition of Pediatric Multisystem Inflammatory Syndrome Temporally Associated with Coronavirus Disease on May 1, 2020 ( COVID-19) (PIMS-TS) ” Ryan CT Cheong, BSc (Hons), MBBS, of Great Ormond Street Hospital for Children NHS Trust in London and colleagues wrote a research letter published in JAMA Otolaryngology – Head & Neck Surgery.

Dysphonia, dysphagia, and anosmia / hyposmia were the most common otolaryngological manifestations in a small cohort of children with multisystem inflammatory syndrome temporally associated with COVID-19, according to data.

“They defined PIMS-TS as persistent fever, inflammation and signs of single or multi-organ dysfunction to the exclusion of other microbial causes and with positive or negative results of the coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) polymerase chain reaction tests with severe acute respiratory syndrome “They added.” In the US, the CDC defined this condition as a multisystem inflammatory syndrome in children [MIS-C]with a more precise case definition. “

To analyze the otolaryngological manifestations of PIMS-TS in children, Cheong and colleagues conducted an exploratory observational cohort study with a center. Researchers reviewed anonymized electronic health records of 50 adolescent patients who met the PIMS-TS case definition between April 1, 2020 and June 22, 2020, and retrieved clinical and demographic data. Additional data were collected through telephone follow-up screening for otolaryngological symptoms. The analyzes were carried out later on August 10, 2020 using Microsoft Excel 2010.

The mean age among the 50 patients included was 10 years. Two-thirds were identified as male, and 72% were from black, Asian, or other underrepresented races or ethnic groups, the researchers wrote. The median time between acute presentation with PIMS-TS and follow-up screening for otolaryngological manifestations was 60 days. Almost a quarter of the children had positive COVID-19 results from polymerase chain reaction tests, while 84% showed positive immunoglobulin G antibodies to the disease based on serological tests. In addition, 76% required admission to a pediatric intensive care unit and 36% required intubation for mechanical ventilation.

After the first telephone screening for otolaryngological manifestations, 38% required additional personal follow-up care from an ENT specialist. These follow-ups were required for otolaryngologic symptoms, the most common of which were dysphonia, dysphagia, and anosmia / hyposmia. These were persistent in 30% of patients at the time of follow-up screening and significantly present in 8% during the acute PIMS-TS presentation.

“Increased rates of otolaryngological manifestations such as dysphonia, dysphagia, and anosmia / hyposmia that persist for more than 6 weeks require otolaryngological follow-up screening and review as required by the multidisciplinary team for all children who differ from PIMS TS recover, “wrote Cheong and colleagues. “Since the long-term consequences of this disease are unknown, it is advisable that children with a history of PIMS-TS be reassessed by the infectious disease team within 12 months and referred to ENT for persistent symptoms.”

ADD SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALARMS

Receive an email when new articles are published

Please enter your email address to receive an email when new articles are published . “data-action =” subscribe “> subscribe

We could not process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this problem, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

COVID-19 Resource Center

COVID-19 Resource Center

Related Articles