Infectious Disease

According to study results, the chances of developing long-term COVID are halved after vaccination

08.09.2021

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Antonelli does not report any relevant financial information. Please refer to the study for all relevant financial information from the other authors.

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Being fully vaccinated reduces the chances of developing long-term COVID by about half compared to being unvaccinated, researchers reported in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

They also reported a breakthrough infection rate in fully vaccinated individuals that was well below 1%.

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Source: Adobe Stock.

The results come from a prospective study using self-reported data obtained from adults in the UK who received either a first or second dose of COVID-19 vaccine between December 8, 2020 and July 4, 2021 a mobile phone app.

During the study period, more than 1.24 million app users reported receiving at least one dose of a COVID-19 vaccine, and more than 971,000 reported receiving two doses Michela Antonelli, PhD, a senior research fellow at King’s College London, and colleagues.

Via the app, 6,030 people (0.5%) said they had a positive COVID-19 test at least 14 days after the first dose but before the second dose, and 2,370 people (0.2%) who received the two Doses reported having received a positive COVID-19 test at least 7 days after completing the vaccine, the researchers reported. The study participants were infected with SARS-CoV-2 on average 73 days after the first dose and 51 days after the second dose.

The authors reported that after one dose (OR = 0.94 per year age increase; 95% CI 0.93-0.95) and two doses (OR = 0.93; 95% CI, 0.92-0.95) , 95).

The likelihood of developing symptoms 28 days or more after initial infection was 49% lower when participants received both doses of a vaccine (OR = 0.51; 95% CI 0.32-0.82).

“Compared to unvaccinated controls, people after their first or second dose of vaccine were less likely to have more than five symptoms in the first week of illness or to be hospitalized and more likely to be completely asymptomatic,” the authors write.

In those over 60 years of age, frailty was associated with a higher risk of infection after vaccination after one dose (OR = 1.93; 95% CI 1.5-2.48).

“Frail adults in long-term care facilities are at particular risk of transmitting respiratory diseases and were disproportionately affected during the COVID-19 pandemic,” the authors write.

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Ziyad Al-Aly, MD, FASN

Ziyad Al-Aly

This is an interesting study; she tells us that after a full vaccination, breakthrough infections are extremely low and are associated with a lower risk of hospitalization.

A major limitation of this report is the reliance on an app to record symptoms and / or health events, which can lead to inaccuracies or incompleteness. Likewise, [the authors] assumed that people were fine when they stopped using the app – which may or may not be true.

I think their analysis for long-term post-breakthrough effects is incomplete and far from conclusive. Whether and to what extent COVID can continue to happen to people for a long time has not yet been conclusively clarified.

Ziyad Al-Aly, MD, FASN

Director, Center for Clinical Epidemiology

Head of Research and Development Service

Veterans Affairs St. Louis Health System

Disclosure: Al-Aly does not report any relevant financial information.

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