Infectious Disease

Viral infections of the respiratory tract are a rising concern of HSCT

February 10, 2021

2 min read

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Wetzstein GA et al. Summary LBA14. Presented at: The 2021 TCT Meetings Digital Experience (virtual meeting); February 8-12, 2021.

Disclosure:
Wetzstein reports a job at ADMA Biologics. In the summary you will find all relevant financial information for all researchers.

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Respiratory viral infections are becoming an increasingly common problem for doctors caring for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, according to results presented at the TCT Meetings Digital Experience.

The results showed significant differences in management strategies for this population without a clear consensus among providers.

Viral infections of the respiratory tract are becoming more common among doctors caring for patients undergoing hematopoietic stem cell transplants.

“There is a need to develop more effective therapies” Gene A. whetstone, PharmD, BCOP, Executive Director and Chief Scientific Officer at ADMA Biologics, a commercial biopharmaceutical company, and colleagues wrote. “Novel therapies are needed to combat viral respiratory infections in this very vulnerable population.”

Viral infections of the respiratory tract contribute significant morbidity and mortality in HSCT recipients. Up to 50% of patients whose infections pass into the lower respiratory tract die.

There is no established standard of care, which is why managing these patients is challenging, depending on the study background.

Wetzstein and colleagues attempted to identify the most common pathogens causing viral infections of the respiratory tract in HSCT recipients, to evaluate current management strategies for patients who develop viral infections in the lower respiratory tract, and to gain insight into the potential of future therapies that may address their unmet needs Cover population. Researchers also wanted to determine the condition of lower respiratory tract infections caused by viral pathogens amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

They distributed a prospective medical questionnaire to key opinion leaders in key HSCT centers in the United States between mid-September and mid-October 2020. A third person administered the questionnaire and the individual results were blinded.

The online platform recorded respondent demographics, information about the exercise site, management strategies for viral infections of the respiratory tract, satisfaction with the available treatment modalities, and the identification and frequency of pathogens.

Twenty-four key opinion leaders from both pediatric and adult HSCT centers completed the questionnaire.

More than 80% said lower respiratory tract viral infections were problematic and increasingly worrying when a standard of treatment was not established. Twelve (50%) identified lower respiratory tract infections as an unsatisfied need with no demonstrated options available; Eight (33%) said they had options available but no consensus or standard of care. and four (16.6%) said they were satisfied with the options available or had a well-established standard of care.

The most common respondents with respiratory viral infections identified in HSCT recipients were respiratory syncytial virus (83.3%), influenza (75%), parainfluenza (58.3%), human metapneumovirus (50%), and cytomegalovirus (33, 3%).

Respondents identified a number of strategies for respiratory viral infections caused by respiratory syncytial virus or other respiratory viruses, with no consensus on optimal management.

The most commonly administered therapies were ribavirin (50%) with or without IV immunoglobulin (27%). Eight percent of respondents said they used steroids and 15 percent said they took supportive measures.

Half of respondents said they were very likely (4%) or likely (46%) to use an IV immunoglobulin product that had elevated levels of antibodies to respiratory syncytial virus and other viral pathogens. Thirteen percent said they were unlikely to use this type of product and eight percent said it was very unlikely.

The majority of respondents (62.5%) said the number of HSCTs will stay the same this year despite the COVID-19 pandemic. Three (12.5%) said the number will increase by 5% to 25%, and four (16.6%) said the number will decrease by 5% to 25%.

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TCT |  Meeting on transplantation and cell therapy

TCT | Meeting on transplantation and cell therapy

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