Infectious Disease

The flu vaccine isn’t efficient in immunocompromised sufferers

January 17, 2021

2 min read

Source / information

Disclosure:
Silveira does not report any relevant financial information. In the study you will find all relevant financial information from all other authors.

ADD SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALARMS

Receive an email when new articles are published

Please enter your email address to receive an email when new articles are published . “data-action =” subscribe “> subscribe

We could not process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this problem, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

According to one study, the effectiveness of the influenza vaccine was significantly lower in immunocompromised adults compared to non-immunocompromised adults during the severe 2017-2018 influenza season.

“The number of immunocompromised people has increased in recent years due to higher life expectancy and the higher number of patients undergoing solid organ and stem cell transplants, advanced cancer treatments, and new immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive drugs to treat autoimmune and inflammatory conditions. ” Fernanda P. Silveira, MD, MS, FIDSA, Healio said, associate professor of medicine and director of clinical operations for transplanted infectious diseases at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center.

Flu shot

The effectiveness of the vaccine in immunocompromised adults was lower compared to non-immunocompromised adults (5% versus 41%).
Photo credit: Adobe Stock

“These immunocompromised people are at increased risk of infections, including influenza, and at higher risk of influenza-related complications such as increased hospital stays, ICU admissions and death,” said Silveira.

According to Silveira, annual influenza vaccination is recommended for immunocompromised patients, but there is little data on how influenza vaccination protects them.

Fernanda P. Silveira

In their study, Silveira and colleagues analyzed data from 10 hospitals to understand the effectiveness of influenza vaccines in immunocompromised adults in the hospital. This included patients aged 18 and over who were hospitalized with an acute respiratory disease (ARI). Vaccine efficacy (VE) was assessed with a test negative case-control design using multivariable logistic regression using PCR-confirmed influenza as the outcome and vaccination status as exposure according to the study.

Among 3,524 adults admitted to hospital with ARI, 1,210 (34.3%) had an immunocompromised disease, reported Silveira and colleagues. These adults were vaccinated more often than non-immunocompromised people (69.5% versus 65.2%) and had less influenza (22% versus 27.8%). According to the study, the total VE against influenza hospitalizations, including immunocompetent adults, was 33% (95% CI, 21% -44%), while the VE in immunocompromised versus non-immunocompromised adults was 5% lower (-29% to 31%) vs. 41% (27% to 52%) (P <0.05 for the interaction term).

According to Silveira, other studies have shown that patients with certain immunocompromised diseases such as organ transplant recipients and cancer patients have fewer humoral immune responses to influenza vaccinations compared to healthy people.

“We don’t know if different types of vaccines improve VE, such as using a high-dose or adjuvant influenza vaccine,” she said. “We did not have enough power in our study to analyze different types of vaccines or different causes of immunodeficiency.”

According to Silveira, it is important to further study VE in the immunocompromised population, including examining whether different vaccine formulations are associated with improved VE, but also to improve vaccination rates of close contacts of immunocompromised patients to create a circle of protection. At the moment, she said, vaccine recommendations for immunocompromised patients are no different from the general public, “except for the use of live attenuated influenza vaccine, which is contraindicated in immunocompromised individuals.”

“By the time we know whether improved vaccines like high-dose and adjuvant vaccines improve flu VE in immunocompromised individuals, reducing influenza exposure in immunocompromised individuals may be more dependent on improving vaccination rates in close contacts,” said Silveira. “Given these results, it is important to remember antiviral treatments for immunocompromised individuals who contract influenza.”

ADD SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALARMS

Receive an email when new articles are published

Please enter your email address to receive an email when new articles are published . “data-action =” subscribe “> subscribe

We could not process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this problem, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

Related Articles