Infectious Disease

Research to guage convalescent plasma for COVID-19 ends after board finds no profit

January 15, 2021

2 min read

Source / information

Disclosure:
Healio was unable to confirm any relevant financial information for Horby and Landray at the time of publication.

ADD SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALARMS

Receive an email when new articles are published

Please enter your email address to receive an email when new articles are published . “data-action =” subscribe “> subscribe

We could not process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this problem, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

Recruitment for the Convalescent Plasma arm of the RECOVERY study was completed after an independent committee determined that there was no evidence that the treatment was benefiting patients with COVID-19, according to the study’s lead investigators.

After a meeting on Thursday, the Data Monitoring Committee (DMC) recommended finalizing the recruitment for the randomized clinical trial testing a range of potential treatments for COVID-19 after finding that there was “no convincing evidence” to support the recruitment additional participant “conclusive evidence of the mortality benefit,” investigators said.

“There is significant international interest in the role of convalescent plasma as a potential treatment for patients hospitalized with COVID-19.” Martin Landray, MB ChB, PhD, Professor of Medicine and Epidemiology at Oxford University and joint investigator for the study, said in a statement. “The results announced today are preliminary and patient follow-up is ongoing.”

The study assessed the benefits of convalescent plasma compared to standard care alone. According to the researchers, a preliminary analysis based on 1,873 reported deaths in 10,406 patients randomly assigned to either arm showed no significant difference in the primary endpoint of 28-day mortality (18% convalescent plasma versus 18% usual care alone; RR = 1.04 95% CI, 0.95-1.14).

“This is the largest study of convalescent plasma to date. It was only possible thanks to the generous donation of plasma by recovered patients and the willingness of current patients to contribute to advancing health care.” Peter Horby, MD, PhD, Professor of Emerging Infectious Diseases at Oxford University and joint investigator for the RECOVERY study, said in a statement. “We are very grateful to all of them. Although the overall result is negative, we must wait for the full results before we can understand whether convalescent plasma plays a role in certain patient subgroups. “

The FDA approved the use of convalescent plasma for hospital patients with COVID-19 in August for questions about its usefulness. Results recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine suggest that high-titer convalescent plasma may be beneficial for patients with COVID-19 who are not mechanically ventilated.

According to RECOVERY investigators, the follow-up of participants is still ongoing and the results will be released as soon as they become available. In the meantime, the study will continue to recruit patients into other treatment arms, including tocilizumab, aspirin, colchicine, and Regeneron’s antibody cocktail.

ADD SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALARMS

Receive an email when new articles are published

Please enter your email address to receive an email when new articles are published . “data-action =” subscribe “> subscribe

We could not process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this problem, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

COVID-19 Resource Center

COVID-19 Resource Center

Related Articles