Infectious Disease

Premature babies have a higher rate of psychotropic drug prescriptions in adolescence

March 17, 2021

2 min read

ADD SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALARMS

Receive an email when new articles are published

Please enter your email address to receive an email when new articles are published . “data-action =” subscribe “> subscribe

We could not process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this problem, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

Premature babies had a higher rate of psychotropic drug prescriptions in adolescence and young adulthood than those born at birth. This comes from a cohort study published in JAMA Network Open.

These higher rates could signal further indications of an increased risk of mental impairment in premature infants, researchers found.

Source: Adobe Stock

“The increased risk [for] Mental health problems in premature babies occur throughout their lifespan, from childhood through puberty to adulthood. ” Christine Strand Bachmann, MD, from the Department of Public Health and Nursing at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, and colleagues wrote. “However, to the best of our knowledge, a minority of studies in this area target adolescence, a time when many mental health problems arise. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the degree of premature birth in individuals and the prescription of psychotropic drugs during puberty and into young adulthood. ”

The investigators analyzed the registration data of all Norwegians (n ​​= 505,030) who were born between 1989 and 1998 after 23 weeks of completed pregnancy. This included people who were born without registered birth defects, lived at the age of 10, and had maternal data. The follow-up period was between 2004 and 2016. Bachmann and colleagues compared the prescriptions of psychotropic drugs between the ages of 10 and 23 years between preterm infants and their peers born at the time of birth. To control family confusion, they compared participants to their siblings. The participants comprised four groups according to gestational age at birth: 762 extremely premature babies (23 weeks and 0 days to 27 weeks and 6 days), 2,907 very premature babies (28 weeks and 0 days to 31 weeks and 6 days), 25,988 moderately or late premature babies (32 weeks and 0 days to 36 weeks and 6 days) and 475,373 full term (37 weeks and 0 days to 44 weeks and 6 days).

The results showed an increased risk of prescribing psychotropic drugs in premature infants. The researchers found a dose-response relationship between gestational age and prescription. Prescriptions for all drug types were higher in the extremely premature group than peers born at birth, with ORs ranging from 1.7 (95% CI, 1.4-2.1) for antidepressants to 2.7 ( 95% CI, 2.1-3.4) for psychostimulants. The moderately to late premature group had a less significantly increased risk of prescribing all types with ORs ranging from 1.1 (95% CI, 1-1.1) for antidepressants to 1.2 (95% CI, 1.1-1 , 2) for psychostimulants. The sibling comparison showed a lower increased risk, with the increases being insignificant for several groups. In the sibling analysis, the OP for each prescription was 1.8 (95% CI, 1.2-2.8) in the preterm group and 1 (95% CI, 0.9-1.1) in the moderately or late preterm group.

“Premature babies have an increased psychological and social risk in their adolescent and young adult years,” wrote Bachmann and colleagues. “This increased risk may be largely related to factors affecting genetics and the childhood environment for the later groups of preterm infants. Trajectories created during puberty are associated with later mental health status and lifelong opportunities. This period could therefore be an important target for health promotion and prevention measures for this group. “

ADD SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALARMS

Receive an email when new articles are published

Please enter your email address to receive an email when new articles are published . “data-action =” subscribe “> subscribe

We could not process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this problem, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

Related Articles