Infectious Disease

Moms with SARS-CoV-2 most likely don’t “infect” newborns when they’re quartered

January 04, 2021

2 min read

ADD SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALARMS

Receive an email when new articles are published

Please enter your email address to receive an email when new articles are published . “data-action =” subscribe “> subscribe

We could not process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this problem, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

Infected mothers seem “unlikely” to transmit SARS-CoV-2 to newborns during placement, Italian researchers reported in JAMA Pediatrics.

Andrea Ronchi, MD, a neonatologist at the Policlinico in Milan, and colleagues examined 62 newborns born between March 19 and May 2 and 61 mothers with SARS-CoV-2 infection who were eligible for housing with their mothers came.

As of July, the AAP will stop recommending separating newborns from mothers with COVID-19 and is reversing the advice it gave at the start of the pandemic.

Of the 61 mothers included in the Italian study, 44 (72%) were diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 before birth. Fourteen of the women (23%) were screened for SARS-CoV-2 infection at delivery, and three women (5%) were diagnosed between 2 and 5 days after giving birth. Of the infected women, 34 (55%) were asymptomatic at the time of delivery and 43 women (70%) were asymptomatic at the time of delivery.

A total of 56 (90%) infants were born at birth and six (10%) were late prematurely. Of the 62 infants, 59 (95%) received breast milk, including 45 (76%) who were exclusively breastfed. One infant (2%) was breastfed and given expressed breast milk, and 13 infants (22%) were breastfed and given a formula.

According to Ronchi and colleagues, only one infant born to a mother in need of intensive care was diagnosed with SARS-CoV-2 prior to discharge (1.6%; 95% CI, 0% -8.7%). The child was born at the gestational age of 36 weeks and was admitted to the intensive care unit on the fifth day of life. The child was released to his father on the 18th day of life and was still positive. The infant received a negative test result from a nasopharyngeal swab test at his 30-day follow-up visit.

Of the remaining 61 infants, none tested positive for SARS-CoV-2 prior to discharge or during their 30-day follow-up appointments.

David A. Kaufman

Karen M. Puopolo

On a related editorial, Infectious Diseases in Children David A. Kaufman, MD, and Karen M. Puopolo, MD, PhDcompared the results to a report on 120 infants born in a New York hospital, all of whom tested negative for SARS-CoV-2. Almost 80% of the infants were breastfed in the first week of life.

The result of the Italian study “is in line with the changing results of a perinatal COVID-19 case register sponsored by the AAP Perinatal Neonatal Medicine section,” wrote Kaufman and Puopolo.

“The takeaway message from Ronchi and colleagues is positive for perinatal physicians and patients who wish to follow recommended maternal-newborn placement practice and plan to breastfeed their infants during the current pandemic,” they wrote. “These results are perhaps best seen with our current understanding of how the virus is rejected and when women are potentially infectious to their infants.”

References:

Kaufman DA et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2020; doi: 10.1001 / jamapediatrics.2020.5100.

Ronchi A et al. JAMA Pediatr. 2020; doi: 10.1001 / jamapediatrics.2020.5086.

ADD SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALARMS

Receive an email when new articles are published

Please enter your email address to receive an email when new articles are published . “data-action =” subscribe “> subscribe

We could not process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this problem, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

COVID-19 Resource Center

COVID-19 Resource Center

Related Articles