Infectious Disease

Infants of ladies with HCV, cirrhosis with out testing, follow-up

December 05, 2020

1 min o’clock

Source / information

Source:

Kushner T. Oral summary 47. Presented at: The Liver Meeting Digital Experience; 13-16 November 2020.

Disclosure:
Reau reports that he has served on advisory or review boards for AbbVie, Merck, Gilead and Intercept, serves on the boards of ABIM, advises for BMS and Gilead, receives grants or research support from GenFit and Gilead, and speaks for and teaches focus medicine and for CCO MedScape.

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Despite a diagnosis of maternal hepatitis C virus and cirrhosis, many infants will not be tested for possible transmission within guidelines, according to a presentation at the Digital Liver Meeting Experience.

“Very few of these children were actually screened for hepatitis C after they were born,” said Dr. Nancy S. Reau in an interview with Healio. “Only about 32% of the infants were tested after the first year.”

In this study, the researchers specifically looked at women diagnosed with HCV followed by cirrhosis and hypothesized that these women were at higher risk for decompensation and possible transmission. Reau noted that decompensation rates were not alarming, but the lack of long-term follow-up care was.

“There were more children who were actually tested – although still a minority of the group – and most of those tests were done within the first year of life, outside of what you would recommend with screening guidelines,” she said.

Reau noted that the guidelines indicate that antibody testing should be done after 18 months with confirmatory PCR testing at 3 years of age.

“While there is no way to see if these children have been put into curative therapy, you would fear that many of these pregnant women with hepatitis C whose children have not been properly monitored,” said Reau.

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