Infectious Disease

Excessive price of COVID-19 vaccination intentions in IBD populations

February 08, 2021

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Dalal does not report any relevant financial information. In the full study you will find all relevant financial information from all other authors.

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A relatively high rate of COVID-19 vaccination intentions has been observed in inflammatory bowel disease populations; However, according to study results, long-term safety concerns were common.

“Targeted contact and education for subpopulations who are less likely to intend to vaccinate can facilitate COVID-19 vaccination efforts.” Rahul S. Dalal, MD, and colleagues wrote in clinical gastroenterology and hepatology.

Despite concerns, there was a high rate of COVID-19 vaccination intentions among IBD patients. Source: Adobe Stock

Between December 22, 2020 and January 26, 2021, Dalal and colleagues recruited two adult IBD populations. One cohort included 2,914 patients from the Brigham Crohn and Colitis Center and Women’s Hospital, the other a population identified through gastroenterology and IBD-specific social media.

Investigators created an anonymous survey to assess demographics, previous IBD history, influenza vaccination status and concerns and intentions regarding the COVID-19 vaccination. A total of 906 patients completed the survey. The survey asked patients whether they would receive a vaccine if it was available, but would undecided or not receive it at a later date. People who hesitated were asked for possible reasons.

The primary outcome was the intention to receive a COVID-19 vaccine when it becomes available. The researchers used multivariable logistic regression to calculate adjusted odds ratios of factors related to vaccination intent.

The survey response was 8.1% among local respondents. Investigators found that self-reported influenza vaccination rates varied by population (92% locally versus 76.3% on social media).

For the local population, the COVID-19 vaccination intent rate was 80.9% versus 60% for the social media population.

“Most reluctant participants selected” fear that the long-term safety of vaccines is unknown “(64.4% local, 70.1% SM) and” prefer to see others tolerate vaccines first “(62.2% local, 55.6% SM). ” Dalal and colleagues wrote. “About 70% want data on the safety / effectiveness of vaccines in patients with IBD.”

The results of the multivariable analysis showed that age over 50 and a bachelor’s degree correlated significantly with vaccination intent for local patients. In the social media population, the white race with a bachelor’s degree, self-reported previous COVID-19 infection, and current biological therapy correlated significantly with vaccination intent.

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