Infectious Disease

COVID-19 delivers a wake-up name to extend virus protection and immunity ranges of exercise

February 12, 2021

1 min read

Source / information

Published by:

Source:

Nieman DC. Immunology of exercise. Presented at Basic and Clinical Immunology for the Busy Clinician; February 5-6, 2021 (virtual meeting).

Disclosure:
Nieman does not report any relevant financial information.

ADD SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALARMS

Receive an email when new articles are published

Please enter your email address to receive an email when new articles are published . “data-action =” subscribe “> subscribe

We could not process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this problem, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

The COVID-19 pandemic has set off a “wake-up call” that physical activity and lifestyle changes related to well-being can boost immunity and virus resistance, noted a speaker at the “Basic and Clinical Immunology for the Busy Clinician” symposium .

With COVID-19 still circulating and influenza picking up again, David C. Nieman, DrPH, FACSM, of Appalachian State University in North Carolina believes that moderate physical activity should be a cornerstone of any public health initiative aimed at minimizing the effects of the pandemic.

“This pandemic is a wake-up call to the world that we need to focus on,” David C. Nieman, DrPH, told attendees. “There is so much we can do to try to get the back of this pandemic.” Source: Adobe Stock

“Lifestyle approaches such as physical activity and weight management will strengthen the host’s antiviral immune defenses and improve the vaccine’s immune response,” Nieman told participants.

He added that in addition to aging and obesity, a lack of physical activity can compromise immunity and affect the host’s virus defenses.

David C. Nieman

By 2030, about 50% of adults in the US will be obese, according to Nieman, while 60% will be overweight or obese worldwide. This can lead to an increased risk of high blood pressure, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, which can be especially important when setting COVID-19.

As a fellow of the American College of Sports Medicine, Nieman offered a “call to action” for more exercise and activity to avert these potential risks for morbidity and mortality. “We encourage people to maintain their immune health by getting off for 30 to 60 minutes most days of the week,” he said.

However, intense overexertion is not recommended for people at high risk for COVID-19, nor for people who are less than two weeks away from recovery from infection or who test positive.

Nieman delved deeper into the benefits of regular exercise and found that physical activity can stimulate the constant exchange of important types of white blood cells between the circulation and tissues. Exercise-related elevations in anti-pathogenic leukocytes could also improve immune surveillance, reduce disease risk, and lower systemic inflammation, he added.

“This pandemic is a wake-up call to the world that we need to focus on,” said Nieman. “There is so much we can do to try to get the back of this pandemic.”

ADD SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALARMS

Receive an email when new articles are published

Please enter your email address to receive an email when new articles are published . “data-action =” subscribe “> subscribe

We could not process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this problem, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

Basic and clinical immunology for the busy clinician

Basic and clinical immunology for the busy clinician

Related Articles