Infectious Disease

Cohort-based exams determine inmates with asymptomatic, presymptomatic COVID-19

December 20, 2020

1 min read

ADD SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALARMS

Receive an email when new articles are published

Please enter your email address to receive an email when new articles are published . “data-action =” subscribe “> subscribe

We could not process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this problem, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

Early cohort-based testing among inmates helped identify new asymptomatic and presymptomatic COVID-19 cases that symptom screening would likely have missed, according to a study published in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

“COVID-19 continues to cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide. There is a high risk of outbreaks in prisons and prisons. ” Ashutosh Wadhwa, DVM, PhD, MS, Health scientists at the CDC Center for Global Health and colleagues wrote. “We wanted to evaluate cohort-based tests in incarcerated individuals who had been exposed to laboratory-confirmed cases of SARS-CoV-2 to identify presymptomatic and asymptomatic cases.”

Prison Bars Stock Image

Early cohort-based testing among inmates revealed new asymptomatic and presymptomatic COVID-19 cases in Cook County Jail that would likely have been missed through symptom screening alone.
Photo credit: Adobe Stock

Between May 1st and May 19th, two test strategies in 12 levels or residential units were introduced in the Cook County Jail in Chicago. According to the study, inmates were asked to either take serial tests, where tests were offered at three points over 14 days (n = 137), or a single test (n = 87). All participants were offered an interview at the end of the 14 days.

Of the 224 detainees addressed, 194 took part in the interview and 172 had at least one test. According to the study, of those who received a test, 19 were positive for COVID-19, 17 in the serial test group and two in the individual test group. The researchers reported that more than half of the newly identified cases were presymptomatic or symptomatic (n = 12; 63%). Among those who reported symptoms in the 2 weeks prior to the test, the most common symptoms were loss of taste or smell (47%), headache (32%), and chills (26%). Of the 151 people interviewed with negative test results, the symptoms commonly reported in the two weeks prior included headache (15%), loss of taste or smell (8%), cough (8%), shortness of breath (8%), chills (7%)) and nasal congestion (7%).

“Our results underscore the usefulness of cohort-based testing approaches that can effectively identify presymptomatic and asymptomatic cases compared to symptom screening alone. In addition, timely and effective measures to separate infected detainees (ie cohort formation and isolation in cells with single occupancy) and staff can reduce the continued transmission of SARS-CoV-2 in detention facilities, ”the authors write. “Early testing of close contacts in quarantine in connection with [infection prevention and control] and other mitigation measures can slow down transmission in prisons and the surrounding community. “

ADD SUBJECT TO EMAIL ALARMS

Receive an email when new articles are published

Please enter your email address to receive an email when new articles are published . “data-action =” subscribe “> subscribe

We could not process your request. Please try again later. If you continue to have this problem, please contact customerservice@slackinc.com.

Back to Healio

COVID-19 Resource Center

COVID-19 Resource Center

Related Articles